neurosciencestuff:

2012 Photomicrography Competition
1st Place: Dr. Jennifer L. Peters & Dr. Michael R. Taylor (St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA)Subject Matter: The blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo (20x)    Technique: Confocal
Dr. Jennifer Peters’ and Dr. Michael Taylor’s winning image of the blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo perfectly demonstrates the intersection of art and science that drives the Nikon Small World Competition.
The blood-brain barrier plays a critical role in neurological function and disease. Drs. Peters and Taylor, developed a transgenic zebrafish to visualize the development of this structure in a live specimen. By doing so, this model proves that not only can we image the blood-brain barrier, but we can also genetically and chemically dissect the signaling pathways that modulate the blood-brain barrier function and development.
To achieve this image, Peters and Taylor used a maximum intensity projection of a series of images acquired in the z plane. The images were first pseudo-colored with a rainbow palette based on depth so that the coloring scheme would be both visually appealing and provide spatial information. In doing so, Peters and Taylor captured an image that Peters says“not only captures the beauty of nature, but is also topical and biomedically relevant.”
Both Peters and Taylor have more than ten years of imaging experience. Peters is an imaging scientist in the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s Light Microscopy Core Facility and Taylor is an Assistant Member in the Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics at St. Jude Children’s Research.
See the 2012 winners

neurosciencestuff:

2012 Photomicrography Competition

1st Place: Dr. Jennifer L. Peters & Dr. Michael R. Taylor (St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA)
Subject Matter:
The blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo (20x)   
Technique:
Confocal

Dr. Jennifer Peters’ and Dr. Michael Taylor’s winning image of the blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo perfectly demonstrates the intersection of art and science that drives the Nikon Small World Competition.

The blood-brain barrier plays a critical role in neurological function and disease. Drs. Peters and Taylor, developed a transgenic zebrafish to visualize the development of this structure in a live specimen. By doing so, this model proves that not only can we image the blood-brain barrier, but we can also genetically and chemically dissect the signaling pathways that modulate the blood-brain barrier function and development.

To achieve this image, Peters and Taylor used a maximum intensity projection of a series of images acquired in the z plane. The images were first pseudo-colored with a rainbow palette based on depth so that the coloring scheme would be both visually appealing and provide spatial information. In doing so, Peters and Taylor captured an image that Peters says“not only captures the beauty of nature, but is also topical and biomedically relevant.”

Both Peters and Taylor have more than ten years of imaging experience. Peters is an imaging scientist in the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s Light Microscopy Core Facility and Taylor is an Assistant Member in the Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics at St. Jude Children’s Research.

See the 2012 winners

post-mitotic:

with a false-color scheme suggestive of that upcoming winter holiday, this image of mouse adipose (fat) tissue is a festive picture of what everyone’s trying to lose
confocal, two-photon microscopy (25x)
credit: Daniela Malide, Nikon Small World Competition 2013

post-mitotic:

with a false-color scheme suggestive of that upcoming winter holiday, this image of mouse adipose (fat) tissue is a festive picture of what everyone’s trying to lose

confocal, two-photon microscopy (25x)

credit: Daniela Malide, Nikon Small World Competition 2013

post-mitotic:

this image of a hippocampal neuron receiving excitatory inputs (purple; synaptic boutons) is the fifth place winner of the 2013 Nikon Small World Competition, released just today
head over to see the other winners
confocal (63x)
credit: Kieran Boyle

post-mitotic:

this image of a hippocampal neuron receiving excitatory inputs (purple; synaptic boutons) is the fifth place winner of the 2013 Nikon Small World Competition, released just today

head over to see the other winners

confocal (63x)

credit: Kieran Boyle

finallymle:

medicalstate:

Cancer Family by Nancy Borowick. (republished with permission)

The burden of cancer does not fall upon just the individual, but also upon the family and friends who support them. It is this shared experience that is so important yet often missed in the cancer narrative. We must always consider how everyone else is surviving this diagnosis.

Nancy Borowick’s mother had been fighting breast cancer for nearly 20 years when her husband was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. They underwent treatment together for a year before he succumbed to his condition.

She sought to document the pain and the challenges they faced in this time but also their strength and their courage together, “from the daily banter they shared as husband and wife to their shifting dynamic as patient and caregiver.

"Cancer gave my family a harsh yet valuable gift: an awareness of time."

Nancy continues to document her mother’s day to day life, from the grief of losing her husband to the strength she finds through her family and friends. For instance, Nancy’s brother-in-law, Paul Flach from the UK, has also lost his father to cancer. He is running the Berlin Marathon this September as part of the UK Institute for Cancer Research fundraising team.

This is so beautiful. 

countdowntomcat:

scienceyoucanlove:

Electron micrograph of a cross-section of muscle tissue. It is surrounded by the extracellular tissue that acts as the connective tissue. Each muscle fiber is joined together by the connective tissue to make up the complete muscle. Image by Martin Oeggerli 
through Daily Anatomy

What layer is this? Is this the fascicle?

countdowntomcat:

scienceyoucanlove:

Electron micrograph of a cross-section of muscle tissue. It is surrounded by the extracellular tissue that acts as the connective tissue. Each muscle fiber is joined together by the connective tissue to make up the complete muscle. 

Image by Martin Oeggerli
 

through Daily Anatomy

What layer is this? Is this the fascicle?

image

neuromorphogenesis:

Hacking The Brain

Abuse of these mind hacking drugs is one of the fastest growing problems of our generation. As long as doctors keep prescribing these harmful drugs to too many youngsters the problem will continue to grow. Although some children really do need these drugs to function regularly, my personal opinion is that the requirements and potency of these drugs should wait until the patient is of age – the same as tobacco or alcohol. The availability of these drugs to young Americans needs to diminish if the trend of usage wants to decrease.

- By AllTreatment

sciencephotolibrary:

Malarial parasites. Coloured scanning electron micrograph of the stomach wall of a mosquito Anopholes stephansii infected with malarial parasites Plasmodium sp. The small rounded objects (blue) covering the outside stomach wall are oocysts, a stage in the life cycle of the parasite. The oocysts grow in size and the contents divide to form sporozoites. On maturity, the oocysts burst and are dispersed through the body cavity. The released sporozoites eventually reach the salivary gland of the mosquito and are transmitted to humans when the female takes a blood meal.
Credit: LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

sciencephotolibrary:

Malarial parasites. Coloured scanning electron micrograph of the stomach wall of a mosquito Anopholes stephansii infected with malarial parasites Plasmodium sp. The small rounded objects (blue) covering the outside stomach wall are oocysts, a stage in the life cycle of the parasite. The oocysts grow in size and the contents divide to form sporozoites. On maturity, the oocysts burst and are dispersed through the body cavity. The released sporozoites eventually reach the salivary gland of the mosquito and are transmitted to humans when the female takes a blood meal.

Credit: LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY